Hist 151, Summer Session 2010

May 24-July 23



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Instructor: Pat Patterson
Office: Building 7, Room 617
Virtual Office Hours: Any time by e-mail
Phone: (808) 845-9417
Course hours: Asynchronous online course
Course location: http://laulima.hawaii.edu

Course Description

History 151: World Civilizations I: This course is a survey of human history from the earliest times to about 1500 CE.

Transfer of Credit

This course transfers to all UH System campuses. At those campuses participating in the System Foundations Agreement, this course transfers with a Foundations/Global A designation.

Student Learning Outcomes

In this course, you will learn, and be able to demonstrate the ability to:
1. Demonstrate cause/effect relationships in history.
2. Summarize key ideas in history, including major world philosophies, religions, and political theories and systems.
3. Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast historical experiences across cultures and time.
4. Describe and define major historical events, ideas, places, people, and other items.
5. Demonstrate understanding of the historical roots of current events.
6. Write an effective historical argument.

Textbooks Required

Craig, Graham, Kagan, Ozment, Turner, The Heritage of World Civilizations, Volume I: to 1700, 8th edition. (ISBN-10: 0-13-600277-3)

Assignments and Examinations

Assignments and Examinations|| Assignment || Possible Points ||
15 Unit Exercises (20 points each)
300
5 Discussion posts/Elluminate Live! Sessions
100
Midterm Exam
100
Final Exam
200
Total Possible
700

Assignment and Exam Specifics

Unit Exercises:

These will be exercises embedded into the online lectures, including puzzles, short quizzes, short essays, and other methods of emphasizing and digesting information. The exercises will test factual knowledge and your ability to link that knowledge into a unified whole. These are formative assessments designed to help you learn the material, and help you know what you need from each unit to be prepared for the summative exams. Each exercise will be worth 20 points. Exercises posted on Mondays will be due on the following Saturday at midnight. Exercises posted on Wednedsays will be due the following Sunday at midnight.

Discussions:

5 times over the semester you will be required to post an answer to a question posted by the instructor, and post a separate response to the answer given by another student. The goal here is to give you practice writing about the history we study, and to encourage the class to get into a discussion on a regular basis on the theory that more brains are better than one! This is always a formative assessment - it is not designed to measure knowledge you have already, but to give you a chance to practice, and to make mistakes. Therefore, the instructor will reply to some, but not all posts, though he will read all posts. Points will be given for participation, but grades will not be given. It is your responsibility to read all the posts of all students each week, and the comments of the instructor to all posts, not just your own, and use them to prepare you for the exams. The answers given to the discussion questions should never be considered complete enough for exams - their purpose is to begin your preparation for exams and provide feedback without risk of hurting your grade. Instructor approval, or lack of instructor comment, does not mean that the discussion answer cannot be improved.

Midterm Exam:

This is the first of two exams in the course. It must be taken at a proctoring center, or with a proctor present. It cannot be taken at home. You will have a week to take the exam. If you do not take the exam within that week period, you may only make it up if you have a valid medical excuse. No valid excuse, no make-up. Exams are scheduled well ahead of time. It is your responsibility to make time to take the exam during the scheduled week.
Make-up exams will be different from the exam the class takes. For all late exams, regardless of the reason, a grade penalty equivalent to one full grade level for each week the exam is late will be exacted. (The first week begins on the day immediately after the day the exam is due. So, if an exam is scheduled for Monday through Sunday, and you are given a make-up exam, and take it on the Monday immediately after the exam was due, your penalty is to lose one grade level - if you earned a B, it will be recorde as a C, for example).
The midterm exam will include questions on units studied from the beginning of the semester up to date of the midterm exam. This exam is designed to measure not only knowledge, but historical understanding and analysis skills, as well as writing. The exam will consist of essays as well as questions about terminology.

Final Exam:


This is the second, and last, of two exams in the course. It must be taken at a proctoring center, or with a proctor present. It cannot be taken at home. You will have a week to take the exam. If you do not take the exam within that week period, you may only make it up if you have a valid medical excuse. No valid excuse, no make-up. Exams are scheduled well ahead of time. It is your responsibility to make time to take the exam during the scheduled week.
Make-up exams will be different from the exam the class takes. For all late exams, regardless of the reason, a grade penalty equivalent to one full grade level for each week the exam is late will be exacted. (The first week begins on the day immediately after the day the exam is due. So, if an exam is scheduled for Monday through Sunday, and you are given a make-up exam, and take it on the Monday immediately after the exam was due, your penalty is to lose one grade level - if you earned a B, it will be recorde as a C, for example).
The final exam will have two parts. The first part will include questions on units studied since the midterm exam. The second unit will include questions about the entire semester. This exam is designed to measure not only knowledge, but improvement in historical understanding and analysis skills, as well as writing. The exam will consist of essays as well as questions about terminology.



Students with Disabilities Statement
Students in this class who need accommodations for a disability should submit documentation and requests to the Services for Students with Disabilities Office (SSD) in Bldg. 2, Room 108A. Phone 845-9282 voice/text or 845-9272 voice/text for more information. If you have already registered your requests with SSD this semester, please contact the instructor and be prepared to provide a current verification letter from SSD. (rev. 3-29-2004)

Student Conduct Code

Students in this class will be expected to follow the HCC and UH student conduct code (http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/policies/scc.pdf)

SAFE Zone

This virtual classroom is a Safe Zone. You may disagree with other students or the instructor, but you are required to listen/read with respect and to address others' ideas seriously and respectfully. We can have a debate without intimidation or anger. Disruption, intimidation, or other forms of physical, verbal, or digital abuse or harassment will result in expulsion from the class temporarily or permanently and will have a negative impact on grades up to and including a failing grade for assignments and/or the course as a whole.

Late Assignments and exams

Late assignments will not be accepted. Discussions and knowledge surveys may not be turned in late for any reason. Personal injury or illness, the illness, injury, or even loss of loved ones is tragic, and I sympathize and have experienced those things myself. These are not reasons to delay coursework. You may turn any assignment in early for one of these reasons. You may choose to miss an assignment for these or other reasons, and those choices are yours to make. However, turning them in late is not an option in this course.
Exams may be made up, according to the policy noted above in the section on assignments and exams. Make-ups may only occur with a valid medical excuse. Make-up exams will be different from exams taken by the rest of the class during the exam week. For each week an exam is late, one grade level will be taken from the score (the first week, and first grade level drop, begins on the day after the exam is due) regardless of the reason for taking the exam late.

Examination Rules

  1. Each exam must be taken during the examination week designated.
  2. Late exams will not be accepted. Make-up exams will be accepted only under the circumstances described in the Late Assignments and Exams, and Assignments and Examinations sections of the syllabus.
  3. Exams MUST be taken at a UH campus proctoring center, or, if you are not in Hawaii, you may take your exam with a designated proctor from another institution.
  4. If you are in the State of Hawaii, and do not have a designated disability that prevents your from travelling to a UH testing center (see the Students with Disabilities Statement, above) you MAY NOT use a proctor other than those provided by UH Testing centers.
  5. For non-Hawaii-based students, finding Proctors is the responsibility of the student. The instructor will not assist in this process. Proctors must be found and designated to the instructor, with e-mail and telephone number, at least two weeks before the exam is to occur. In no case can a proctor be a relative or friend. Proctors must be someone with an official capacity that qualifies them to watch and guarantee to the instructor that all exam rules have been followed. Proctors must be present during the entire period of the exam.
  6. During the exams, no assistance will be allowed. No notes, no books, and no websites other than the examination window on Laulima are allowed. This includes a ban on the use of other functions of Laulima - no reference to discussions, e-mail, or other Laulima tools or functions is permitted.
  7. No personal music players, no electronic dictionaries, no cellular phones or other personal media players or personal digital assistants of any kind may be used during the exam. If your phone rings during the exam, and you choose to answer, or to even look at the screen, the proctor will be directed to stop your exam at that point. What you have finished by that time will be graded by the instructor. You will not be allowed to continue after you finish your call, regardless of the subject. Be prepared, tell friends and relatives you cannot recieve calls during the exam, and turn off your phone and i-pod and any similar devices.
  8. It is your responsibility to check with proctoring sites to be sure they are open both at the time you plan to arrive, and for the entire time that the testing will continue. You will not be allowed to retake your exam if the proctoring center is unable to allow you to test because of closing time. Call them, be sure you KNOW when they are open and where you are going.
  9. The instructor cannot schedule exam times for you. Contact the proctoring center you plan to use in advance and schedule your exam.
  10. The proctoring center staff have no decision-making power over exams, times, notes or assistance allowed. They follow the instructions of the class teacher. Do not take out frustration or anger on them, or try to bargain with them on test rules, time, or format. If you have a grievance about the exam, take it up with the instructor. Any rudeness or abuse of proctoring center staff will result in immediate failure of the examination in question. Repeated acts of rudeness abuse, or harassment of proctoring center staff will result in grade penalties up to and including failure of the entire course.
  11. Use your best judgment when taking exams. Don't plagiarize, don't cheat. The test is there to evaluate your skills, and represent those skills back to you as an indicator of your current knowledge and ability, and give you goals to shoot for as you try to improve. It is not a measurement of you as a person. Cheating on an exam is really cheating yourself as well as cheating those other students who put effort in despite their own challenging lives.

Plagiarism (Copying)

Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. If you do not know what plagiarism is, be sure to learn. I will be checking every paper and every discussion post for plagiarism. Any use of the words, or the ideas of another person without giving credit to them is plagiarism. Further, any re-use of your own or another student's work, turned in for another class or another assignment, is also plagiarism. According to the UH Student Conduct Code, any instance of plagiarism is grounds for expulsion.
My policy is very simple. If you plagiarize once, you fail the assignment on which plagiarism was found. There is no appeal and no credit. If you plagiarize twice, you fail the course, and the Administration will be notified. I don't bend on this.
DON'T PLAGIARIZE!

Cheating on Exams and Quizzes

DON'T CHEAT!
Any student who is found to be cheating will fail the course, and the administration will be notified. According to the UH Code of Student Conduct:
"Cheating includes, but is not limited to, giving or receiving unauthorized assistance during an examination; obtaining or distributing unauthorized information about an examination before it is given; using inappropriate or unallowable sources of information during an examination; falsifying data in experiments or other research; altering the record of any grade; altering answers after an examination has been submitted; falsifying any official University record; or misrepresenting the facts in order to obtain exemptions from course requirements."

Keeping Records of Your Work

Keep all assignments you turn in for class. If the instructor requires copies in order to verify grades, you must be able to provide them. This is the responsibility of the student, as well as the instructor, and helps to avoid the problems that can occur in the event of unintentional loss of data.

Effort and Assigning Grades

Grades in this course will be assigned based on performance only. The instructor has no way to measure how long you studied, or how hard you may have tried.
If you wish to dispute a grade, you may do so. Understand that disputes will be adjudicated based on the grading rubric for the assignment, and references to effort and time spent will have no effect. Appeals to need of a grade for GPA reasons, or need to pass in order to graduate also will have no merit in adjudicating grading disputes.

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